How do you feed your dog/s?

General discussion on all labradoodle-related matters - anything not otherwise covered by specific forums on the site.

How do you feed your Dog?

I feed commercial/complete food in a bowl
27
47%
I feed Barf/similar
18
31%
I feed commercial/complete foods from a Kong/Tug a jug/other device
7
12%
Other - please explain
6
10%
 
Total votes: 58

Barneyboy
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Joined: 08 Sep 2007, 21:06

Re: How do you feed your dog/s?

Post by Barneyboy » 15 May 2009, 19:12

If you want to feed Kibble from a 'Kong', what you need is a Squirrel Dude! http://www.dog-toy.co.uk/dogproducts/?product=140

I can't get a whole 'meal' in the large one, so I fill it and scatter feed the rest. It has 'prongs' around the entrance hole, which mean the kibble comes out slowly. When introducing a dog to this sort of thing, it's best to fill the toy as full as possible, so the dog gets frequent rewards initially. The only problem with Squirrel Dude is to increase the rate of dispensing, or for large kibble, you have to trim the prongs - and of course the isn't reversible, so there is no way of making it harder when your dog can empty it in 5 second flat! Another alternative would be the Buster cube, or the Dog Pyramid, both very substantial dispensing toys.
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broadloan
Posts: 25
Joined: 08 Mar 2009, 18:04

Re: How do you feed your dog/s?

Post by broadloan » 16 May 2009, 17:55

I would really like to try this type of diet, but again, I'm confused as to how much my doodle should be fed at any one time.....with the dry food, measuring is easy ofcourse...can anyone advise?

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Katie Rourke
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Re: How do you feed your dog/s?

Post by Katie Rourke » 16 May 2009, 18:30

Guidelines for quantities are given in Billinghursts books, without which you shouldn't really start to think about changing your dog's diet.

However, these are just guidelines. I increase the amount of food I feed my dogs if I'm giving them more exercise and I don't feed so much on their "quieter" days.

You should be able to feel the ribs of your doodle, and see the outline of them (but not see each rib individually) when they're wet or clipped short.

When you can't feel the ribs easily your dog is too fat - no matter what the quantity it says you "should" feed on the packet!

I've just made a batch of breakfast bars for my chaps... Flossy is having them as "snacks" in between meals of chicken wings, lamb necks, lights, heart, liver and beef trimmings because she's feeding a hungry family right now. David and George only get them for breakfast every other day.

5 cups porridge oats or Museli (without added sugar or salt)
1 cup wholemeal flour
1 cup boiling water
8 Tablespoons good quality oil (rotate for variety) "Cool Oil" from the Groovy Food company and Lintbells Omega Oils work well for me.
5 Tablespoons Blackstrap Molasses
5 Tablespoons Honey
4 Medium or 5 Small eggs (with shells - optional)

Optional extras: Couple of tablespoons mixed dried herbs, couple teaspoons of Kelp.

Mix all the ingredients thoroughly and turn into a lined baking tray so the mix is about 1" to 1 1/2" thick.

Cook at 200 degrees (Fan oven) for about 45 mins. Turn onto a cooling rack. After 10 mins score into squares. Break into Breakfast Bars when cold. Stores in an airtight container for about 3 days, in the fridge for a few days longer...

Tip: If you do the oil first, then use the same spoon for the honey and molassas it won't stick to the spoon.
Katie is a passionate canine professional who has been working with dogs all of her adult life. She is an experienced clicker trainer and has trained dogs for Films and TV. Katie now runs http://www.centrestagedoggrooming.co.uk/home.html.

Clare
Posts: 118
Joined: 16 May 2009, 15:39

Re: How do you feed your dog/s?

Post by Clare » 25 May 2009, 12:59

I feed Pebbles (7 month old ASD) a wet food called Lily's Kitchen. When we got her she was on Royal Canin but hardly ate at all, as soon as we changed her food she was so much more energetic and had a growth spurt and much better poos. It looks llike home-cooked food - meat and veg. I would love to home cook her food sometimes but have no idea how much, in terms of proportions and supplements. The BARF diet interests me but I am not quite ready to embark upon it yet. I am very unsure of giving bones. Do you need to watch them while they eat in case the bone splinters? Do the bones smell?
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Clare and Pebbles

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Katie Rourke
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Re: How do you feed your dog/s?

Post by Katie Rourke » 25 May 2009, 14:59

Hi Clare

I've just seen Lilys Kitchen advertised and so don't know that much about it. Is it organic? What form does it come in - pouches? Tins? ?? Thanks in advance.
Katie is a passionate canine professional who has been working with dogs all of her adult life. She is an experienced clicker trainer and has trained dogs for Films and TV. Katie now runs http://www.centrestagedoggrooming.co.uk/home.html.

Clare
Posts: 118
Joined: 16 May 2009, 15:39

Re: How do you feed your dog/s?

Post by Clare » 26 May 2009, 08:30

Lily's Kitchen is in tins or smaller foil containers. It it not 100% organic but mostly. It has no soya or wheat , just meat, veg, friut, herbs and oils. You can see the ingredients in it and it looks "home cooked" . There are 3 flavours, lamb, turkey and chicken, and beef. The tin says it is holistic! It is sold in a chain of vets near us called "Village Vets". I have no idea if it is all that it claims but Pebbles seems to thrive on it. It smells like real food - when I was young we had cats and their food used to smell disgusting and this smells fine.
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Clare and Pebbles

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Katie Rourke
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Re: How do you feed your dog/s?

Post by Katie Rourke » 26 May 2009, 14:12

Thanks Clare

I'll look into it further!
Katie is a passionate canine professional who has been working with dogs all of her adult life. She is an experienced clicker trainer and has trained dogs for Films and TV. Katie now runs http://www.centrestagedoggrooming.co.uk/home.html.

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Parker
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Joined: 31 Aug 2008, 23:58
Location: West Sussex

Re: How do you feed your dog/s?

Post by Parker » 26 May 2009, 21:37

Parker has Orijen in a bowl mixed with sardines, tuna, cottage cheese etc. He has bones in the garden when it's warm and sometimes on low exercise, really wet days, for example, I'll put his kibble in a tug-a-jug. He used to have Kongs but he either got it all out too quickly or if it was hard to get out, he just wouldn't bother :|
Jo and Parker x
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Clare
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Joined: 16 May 2009, 15:39

Re: How do you feed your dog/s?

Post by Clare » 27 May 2009, 08:32

When you feed a mixture like the above, how do you know how much to give of each or is it just guess work and you cut down the amounts if the dog seems to be putting on weight. I haven't been sure whether to feed "wet" and "dry" food in the same meals because I thought they took different times to digest.
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Clare and Pebbles

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Jeanny
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Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 18:43

Re: How do you feed your dog/s?

Post by Jeanny » 28 May 2009, 16:43

Theres a bit of confusion I think on the BARF diet and RAWMEATYBONES.

Tom lonsdale explains it better than I can so go to
http://www.rawmeatybones.com/petowners/whynotBARF.php

Its easy to do the RAWMEATYBONES once you have managed to get over the 'feeding petfood' mindset. I source chicken backs from a poulty producer, incredibly cheap. Then add breast of lamb, Beef ribs, whole chickens when on offer in supermarket. Some offal is needed to balance the diet, Macro sell stuff reasonably, I have a friendly butcher that sells me kidney, hearts and liver at very reasonable prices. And you can add kitchen scraps, eggs, cheese etc.

The mini doodle found it a bit difficult to go from stuff she slurped up to actually chewing, my sons lab took to it more readily. I put the minced raw stuff I had been feeding in the chicken backs, once she started licking it out she then carried on and ate the chewier stuff. The guides to how much to feed are onthe RAWMEATYBONES site, I got his book which was helpful.

They do small neat poos, aren't hungry, teeth are clean, coats look good.

Bye
Jeanny

ps copied this from knowledgeable feeder on the Yahoo rawmeatybones forum, a good place to join if you need help.

There's no need to get hooked up on percentages of bone/organ etc either -
it is a very rough guideline and you might feed liver one week but not again
for another month or so and feed a different organ another week etc. The
main thing to focus on is the proportion of meat to bone which again you
will judge by how constipated or loose your pet gets. Too much bone =
constipation and too much straining to go to the toilet; too loose = too
much meat and not enough bone! Tied in with this there is no need to get
concerned over a "balanced diet" at every meal - it's an invention of pet
food companies because they are intending you to just buy their one
"complete" diet. They can't have a Monday morning diet bag, followed by a
Tuesday morning diet bag that takes into consideration that you do a longer
walk on a Tuesday! Nutrients to some degree will even out over time so as
long as your pet gets everything they need during every 2 week period or so
they will be just great. We don't worry about eating a scientifically
measured balanced diet every meal so there is no need for us to either.

The best measure of how much to feed is by your eye - ie how fat/thin your
pet is taking into consideration how hot or cold the climate is at that time
of year etc and exercise levels, pregnancy etc Most people find that after a
while pets find their own intake level to some degree on the RMB diet which
will help you gauge the amount to feed. Protein is a much more satisfying
component to the diet than carbs which is why they are better at
self-regulating to some degree
Arianne, dirty, hot and scruffy - now a whole year old - with her pal Mollie.
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Clare
Posts: 118
Joined: 16 May 2009, 15:39

Re: How do you feed your dog/s?

Post by Clare » 28 May 2009, 18:44

I would realy like to give Pebbles a bone to see how she likes it - not ready to convert just yet! What do I ask the butcher for? any type of bone or a specific one?
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Clare and Pebbles

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Jeanny
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Re: How do you feed your dog/s?

Post by Jeanny » 28 May 2009, 19:10

Clare wrote:I would realy like to give Pebbles a bone to see how she likes it - not ready to convert just yet! What do I ask the butcher for? any type of bone or a specific one?
The big weightbearing bones from cows are not suitable. They need to be able to crunch them up and those bone may damage teeth. Butchers bones often don't have any meat on them and too much would cause constipation.

So I recommend you buy a breast of lamb. Ask him to slice it into ribs and use it as part of her rations for the day. Replace a breakfast or a tea with it.

Beef rib bones are good if they have a bit of meat on them, depends how nice your butcher is.

regards
Jeanny
Arianne, dirty, hot and scruffy - now a whole year old - with her pal Mollie.
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Barneyboy
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Joined: 08 Sep 2007, 21:06

Re: How do you feed your dog/s?

Post by Barneyboy » 28 May 2009, 19:17

I'm not a BARF expert, but I thought cow leg bones were considered 'recreational' bones, for gnawing and chewing on, and lamb breast is more likely to be given as part of a meal - crunched up and swallowed.........
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Jeanny
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Re: How do you feed your dog/s?

Post by Jeanny » 29 May 2009, 12:10

Barneyboy wrote:I'm not a BARF expert, but I thought cow leg bones were considered 'recreational' bones, for gnawing and chewing on, and lamb breast is more likely to be given as part of a meal - crunched up and swallowed.........
Big ribs are better recreational bones, the big weight bearing bones are too hard, they may gnaw on them but do stand a good chance of breaking teeth.

regards
Jeanny
Arianne, dirty, hot and scruffy - now a whole year old - with her pal Mollie.
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