A tap on the nose

General discussion on all labradoodle-related matters - anything not otherwise covered by specific forums on the site.
chelsea
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Re: A tap on the nose

Post by chelsea » 18 Oct 2009, 10:28

Barneyboy wrote:Dogs do NOT know when they have done wrong - they are reading your body language and reacting to that with appeasing behaviour......
:lol: So true. Try and focus on yourself rather than the dog next time you think he/she knows they have done something wrong. I bet when you walk into the kitchen and see the contents of the bin strewn across the floor you react in some slight way even if you don't say a thing. Dogs are genius' at reading body language, even ours, which must be well confusing for them a lot of the time.

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julies0708
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Re: A tap on the nose

Post by julies0708 » 18 Oct 2009, 11:41

Agree, dogs do not have the brains that we humans have and cannot reason, so therefore can't think, oops I've been caught, I've done wrong

What they are doing is reading your body language - you come in 1st thing you see is the contents of your bin over the floor you take a big intake of breath, your nostrils flare, your shoulders go up and then you turn and look at the dog and all he can see is that you have increased in size have a scowl on your face and your eyes are about to pop out of your head so they turn and try to get out of your way

and a complete no-no for tapping on nose, reward good behaviour ignore bad
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Doodlenut
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Re: A tap on the nose

Post by Doodlenut » 18 Oct 2009, 23:08

Agree, dogs do not have the brains that we humans have and cannot reason, so therefore can't think, oops I've been caught, I've done wrong

What they are doing is reading your body language - you come in 1st thing you see is the contents of your bin over the floor you take a big intake of breath, your nostrils flare, your shoulders go up and then you turn and look at the dog and all he can see is that you have increased in size have a scowl on your face and your eyes are about to pop out of your head so they turn and try to get out of your way
your comments have been noted, but will just say in my defence I'm not always aware of the devesation at times until after i have seen Riley. I come in and greet him as I always do, I see him creep over and then I then look round the corner to see what he's been up to. He does make me laugh and rarely able to keep a straight face (whixh I know is not helpful. Its a bit like when he thinks he can creep up the stairs without me noticing. Didn't think dogs could tip toe, just like a cartoon. :lol: Difficult to notice a 47kg dog
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MrsAdmin
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Re: A tap on the nose

Post by MrsAdmin » 18 Oct 2009, 23:14

Doodlenut wrote: Difficult to notice a 47kg dog
47kg :shock: :shock: :lol: That's not a Doodle, it's a Labraphant :shock:

What a HUGE bundle of gorgeous fun Riley is :P
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KateW
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Re: A tap on the nose

Post by KateW » 18 Oct 2009, 23:49

Holly & Nick wrote:Well we will not be doing that then! Many people seen to give so much advice I'm just having trouble sieving through the helpful true advice and rubbish i.e "tap them on the nose when they have done something wrong".

I think because we have two recues of a similar age it is going to take a little longer to train them and we need to do a lot more one to one. Things we have had problems with are pulling, stealing food, barking aggressively at strangers, chewing, and jumping up. We will be taking both of them to training as soon as we get their boosters up to date and hopefully this will give us a little more confidence with our methods.

I was considering a tap on the nose for honey who barks aggressively at strangers and other dogs. I have tried using the tone of my voice, stern and calm, but it doesn't seem to have any effect. I believe she is doing it because of her insecurity from her previous life and I think the best way to cope is by using a calm voice as this will hopefully reassure her in the long term. However many people still preach the sterner approach. But has anyone got any ideas for this particular problem??

Sorry for the waffling and thank you for all the advice so far.

I think that as the dogs form a stronger bond with you and you work together at training, a lot of thing will fall into place. I agree with everybody else that it can never be right to physically punish a dog and a previous owner being heavy handed may well have caused this problem. And you are quite right to identify the need to give them plenty of one to one training.

On the issue of nervous barking at other dogs, this became a problem for us after Rufus was attacked when he was on his lead by a pit bull terrier. Elaine, who wrote most of the training advice on the Labradoodle Trust site, advised me to teach the "Watch me" command and recommended a book called "Feisty Fido" by Patricia Mc Connell (ph) which is available from http://www.canineconcepts.co.uk/

Rufus was obviously barking to announce his presence and the fact that he was not to be messed with; he has never barked at little dogs or puppies and barked most ferociously when approached by an off lead dog. When he is off lead he greets every dog with delight and is very playful.

The "watch me" command simply involves having a small treat in the hand and asking the dog to "watch me" as you anticipate barking. When the dog is diverted and walks past the "threat" you hand over the treat.....

The other thing we did which I believe was again recommended by Elaine is to go to busy outdoor markets and walk around and around. There are always lots of dogs ....

We are lucky in that Rufus has a lot of dog friends and is very sociable so if the other dog owner was willing, I would briefly explain what had happened and if we spoke for a minute or two Rufus would be perfectly relaxed. Might be worth a try with Honey?

Rufus has never barked at people but was like most doodles very keen on jumping up. I found the best way to overcome this was to get him to sit and ask the person we were talking to to ignore him for a couple of minutes. Personally I don't allow anyone I don't know to give treats to my dog because there are some very strange characters around and I like the dog to associate food with familiar people.

Good luck with your two and do let us know how you get on.....

Katherine
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Barneyboy
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Re: A tap on the nose

Post by Barneyboy » 19 Oct 2009, 07:26

your comments have been noted, but will just say in my defence I'm not always aware of the devesation at times until after i have seen Riley. I come in and greet him as I always do, I see him creep over and then I then look round the corner to see what he's been up to. He does make me laugh and rarely able to keep a straight face (whixh I know is not helpful. Its a bit like when he thinks he can creep up the stairs without me noticing. Didn't think dogs could tip toe, just like a cartoon. :lol: Difficult to notice a 47kg dog
He's may have learnt as a pup to react like this.
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peelm
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Re: A tap on the nose

Post by peelm » 19 Oct 2009, 13:40

Hi all,

I agree with pretty much all of what's been said. I'd just like to add that you should never use the dogs name when you're chastising him / her. The name should never ba associated with anything negative. i've noticed that by pure chance, I use a shortened form of the dogs name. If I'm being a bit sharp with them to get their attention, Fozzie becomes Fozz, and Dylan becomes Dyl.
But anything more than sharpness I just use a noise and sometimes a touch.

47KG!!!!
I thought Fozzie was a big lad at 43kg, but he's a mere slip compared to that.

M.
Michael, Janet, Fozzie and Dylan

For all your pet portraits, visit :- http://www.theloudhouse.co.uk

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Bid
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Re: A tap on the nose

Post by Bid » 19 Oct 2009, 14:01

I have a food thief - my elderly lab who you'd think was too old and stiff to jump, and to achey to move fast, but he can shift like greased lightening and grab a sandwich from the work surface as he flies past :evil: I tried leaving traps (the best one was a tray hanging over the edge, loaded with saucepans filled with water, and with a mustard sandwich on it) but they didn't put him off, so I too have to make sure I never leave any food out for him. One handy hint - Simplehuman butterfly bins - the dogs can't open them, and when knocked over they stay shut :twisted: :twisted:
www.dogtrekker.co.uk
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Beauty without vanity, strength without insolence, courage without ferocity, and all the virtues of man without his vices - Byron

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Holly & Nick
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Re: A tap on the nose

Post by Holly & Nick » 27 Oct 2009, 00:11

Hi Everyone,

Just to up date you all, we have taken on alot of the advice given and Honey is responding well. In fact at the weekend we went to go ape with all the family and she was brilliant only barking at one person all day in a very busy forest in thetford.

I think not only has she relaxed in her new home but we have relaxed too and this helps when she meets new people.

Our main problem now is to stop Mylo stealing food but I think | am loosing this battle as he is very very sneaky!

Barneyboy
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Re: A tap on the nose

Post by Barneyboy » 27 Oct 2009, 08:38

That sounds very positive.

Re the stealing food thing - think of it more as training the family not to leave food around when the dog is loose - it's easier!
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KateW
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Re: A tap on the nose

Post by KateW » 28 Oct 2009, 00:00

Holly & Nick wrote:Hi Everyone,

Just to up date you all, we have taken on alot of the advice given and Honey is responding well. In fact at the weekend we went to go ape with all the family and she was brilliant only barking at one person all day in a very busy forest in thetford.

I think not only has she relaxed in her new home but we have relaxed too and this helps when she meets new people.

Our main problem now is to stop Mylo stealing food but I think | am loosing this battle as he is very very sneaky!
That's great news about Honey :D I think the more relaxed the owner is, the happier the dog.....

Let us hope that Mylo doesn't learn to open the fridge as Rufus did; we used to find him sitting in front of it as though watching tv :roll: He made the occasional raid. We now have a new fridge and deliberately chose one with a concealed handle :lol:

Katherine
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