Working full time with a Labradoodle?

General discussion on all labradoodle-related matters - anything not otherwise covered by specific forums on the site.
iwantadog
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Re: Working full time with a Labradoodle?

Post by iwantadog » 24 Oct 2014, 16:36

I work part-time in a school, so have all ththe holidays off. Wegot Murphy at the start of the summer holidays, so I had five weeks with him to get him used to being left.

When he was younger a friend used to pop in and walk him for me sometimes, but not every day.

I leave the house at 8.15am and am home by 2.30pm. Murphy knows the routine on a week day! I walk him at 6.00am every week day, then he has breakfast just before I leave for work and puts himself to bed until I come home. He is so used to this routine.

I had a few negative comments for working part time when we got him, I also had one breeder refuse to sell me one of her puppies, but I know that Murphy has a very good life with us and is spoilt rotten and I love him to bits.

Good luck with whatever you decide.
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oakesr
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Re: Working full time with a Labradoodle?

Post by oakesr » 24 Oct 2014, 17:19

I Work part time and my husband works shifts, but there are some days when Roma is left alone for 5-6 hours. She is fine; we recorded her a few times and she just sleeps.

We got her when I was on long term sick leave and from day 2 she was taught she would be alone at times. We started with just 10 mins and built it up steadily. I'll admit, I would not have got a pup if I had not been off for the first 4 months; I'm not sure you could house train a pup whilst working full time, but I'm sure some people do!

She is walked before I go to work and when I come in. She is safe, loved and seems content - she knows nothing different.

Everyone's situation is different, it is a big and expensive decision, so it's good that you're thinking it through so carefully. Very best of luck with whatever you decide
Rachel & Roma
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Vince
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Re: Working full time with a Labradoodle?

Post by Vince » 24 Oct 2014, 19:22

My first post.
We've had our gorgeous boy since February. (His name is Velcro). I'm a first time owner. We both work full time. Me, mon to fri. Wife mon to Thursday. I took 2 weeks off to initially settle him. We built up periods alone to get him accustomed to it. Then I went back to work. You need to expect a puppy that young to need to "go". We restricted velcro to the tiled kitchen and utility room. We also bought training pads. The pads often became ripped up toys but he never soiled his crate. Yes we had a few issues of him soiling under the dining room table if we weren't watching but not often. Now he's 10 months old he is totally house trained/house proud and will not go indoors. He also does a brilliant "ask" to go out. You have to expect a puppy to go when it has to and try to guide it appropriately.
As wor walking. When he was old enough and fully vaccinated we started taking him to classes. The trainers also offer walking services when we're both working our trainer takes him out. That has the added benefit of helping his dog socialisation skills.
It is doable. Just make sure you can afford the walking fees etc. and make damn sure you insure your dood. Velcro has already needed treatment for grass seeds in his paw and ear canal.

Ianto!
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Re: Working full time with a Labradoodle?

Post by Ianto! » 24 Oct 2014, 20:07

Hscott,
Hi, and welcome to the forum. I wanted to say that I'm pleased you have the best interests of any future pup at heart, that's a great start!
I have had a dog in the past and worked full time - but there were other members of the family around so she wasn't left alone for too long. It is recommended that you don't leave a dog longer than four hours.
Doodles are, in the main, such social dogs - our lad loves people and company. And they are intelligent and mischievous, too. If I have to go out and leave him, I can't wait to get back to him and make it a rule never to leave him longer than four hours. Personally speaking, I wouldn't say that popping back in for half an hour re-sets the clock... but that is only my opinion.
I do know someone who has a doodle and works full-time. She is in doggy day care and is the most beautifully behaved girl - the carer makes sure she is trained and, of course, she also has lots of company canine and human. If I had to work full time, this is what I would choose for my dood.
Vince,
I have to say welcome to the forum too - and love your dood's name - it's what I call our lad sometimes as he gathers 'stuff' into his coat, rather than shedding! :lol:
Anne & Ianto x

val&finn
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Re: Working full time with a Labradoodle?

Post by val&finn » 24 Oct 2014, 23:26

Hi there, I would echo the concerns that others have voiced regarding leaving a pup alone for several hours - I think it could cause a lot of upset, both for you and the pup and may result in behavioural problems (not just the accidents) which could be costly to resolve. Until the pup is 6-7 months old at least you would need to have a dog walker coming in between the time you leave and somebody returning at lunch time. I think you will find that reputable breeders would not let you have a pup if you were both working full-time.

However, there is another option - have you considered adopting an older Dood, for example from the Labradoodle Trust? They are all in foster care, so the carer can assess the dog's personality and tell you for how long it can be left. Doodles mature late, Finn was 3 years before he calmed down but then he snoozed a lot and at times we left him for up to 3 hours.

All the best - not an easy decision to make - can fully understand your longing for one of those hairy, expensive, boisterous, training-resistant, funny and utterly addictive Doodles. We started with one, now have two - and who knows when No 3 will arrive...
Val, Finn Doodle & Izzy Whizz

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Bid
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Re: Working full time with a Labradoodle?

Post by Bid » 25 Oct 2014, 13:49

I am not sure what they do, but I would hope that the Doodle Trust don't place dogs in a home where everyone in the family works full time - most reputable rescues won't.
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gilly g
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Re: Working full time with a Labradoodle?

Post by gilly g » 25 Oct 2014, 23:54

That's a bit harsh, Bid.
What happens if a dog is rehomed to a not-working-full time-home and further down the line, owners circumstances change? Are they then obliged to give the dog up to be rehomed yet again?

Personally, I would not have got a dog unless I could give him/her the attention that that dog requires.

When I had Polo as a 7 week old pup, I took 2 weeks off work to devote my time to him. He was marvellous (and I was very, very lucky) house trained almost from day one, slept through the night in his crate. I worked 9.30-1400 mon to fri and initially had an octagonal puppy pen attached to his crate to confine him, as we had just had 2 years of expensive, major work on the house, which included a new kitchen and solid wood floors throughout. Divorce impending, otherwise!

After a couple of years, I was at home full time. Polo slept an awful lot of the time during the day: I had to force him into the garden for a wee, but as soon as I got his lead, he was very excited to go for a long walk. I then changed my work pattern and worked 2 full days (left at 8.30 returned at 5.30), but couldn't get home at lunchtime. So my husband drove home at lunch (3/4 hour trip,) and drove back to work, (another 3/4hour trip) to take Polo out. Invariably, Polo was asleep on the sofa, He really begrudged being disturbed!!

So now my work pattern has changed yet again, and he seems perfectly happy being left from 8.30 til 3.30, 3 days a week, and on those days when I am at home full time, he sleeps an awful lot!

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Bid
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Re: Working full time with a Labradoodle?

Post by Bid » 26 Oct 2014, 00:44

gilly g wrote:That's a bit harsh, Bid.
It's not me - it's what the rescues find best, because a lot of the dogs they get in are from families that work full time, and it so often doesn't work - the dogs develop all sorts of issues ...

these are the first breed rescues I looked at, and they all state that they will not rehome a dog to a family that work full time.

http://www.labrador-rescue.org.uk/paddy.html
http://www.weimaraner-rescue.org.uk/adoption_info.php
http://www.bichonfriserescue.co.uk/page_1444277.html
http://www.poodlesinneed.com/Pages/LOOK ... OODLE.aspx
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gilly g
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Re: Working full time with a Labradoodle?

Post by gilly g » 26 Oct 2014, 19:54

Bid, my comment was not directed at you personally, but at the attitude of some rescues.
I think it would be better for them to have an open mind, and match on individual circumstances.

jonb
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Re: Working full time with a Labradoodle?

Post by jonb » 27 Oct 2014, 11:56

You are in a very similar position to us....we both leave about 8 but i only work a mile down the road so go home for lunch every day for an hour then back home at half 4. When he was younger Roker would be in his cage then we moved so he had his cage and the kitchen and since moving he now has the living room with access to his cage, toys, water etc and is fine. For a while early on as well i would split my lunch into two half hour breaks to pop back and check on him. These days i often come back to him curled up snoozing on the settee without a care in the world!

If you have access to iPhones\iPads take a look at a free app called "Presence". It basically allows you to use your iDevices like a security camera and can keep an eye on them. I used to set up the iPad plugged in with the camera able to see the majority of the room and then could use my iPhone to connect in and check every so often.

Chelle46
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Re: Working full time with a Labradoodle?

Post by Chelle46 » 27 Oct 2014, 20:32

Bid as you are a member of the friends of Doodle trust I would of assumed you would know the trust takes into account the working patterens of everybody who applies to adopt a dog!

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doodleted
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Re: Working full time with a Labradoodle?

Post by doodleted » 27 Oct 2014, 21:46

Hi. We have just been lucky enough to offer a home to our second Doodle. She was put up for rehoming by her previous owners due to an enormous change in their personnal lives. They found themselves having to leave her for up to 10 hours a day and she was starting to do damage and make a mess in the house. Sadly they had to make the heart breaking decision to find a new home for her.
We now have three dogs.
I think if you are going to get any dog you are probably better getting a puppy , it will then be use to being left and your routine from very early in its life. Also we have just got our dog through a rescue center and they are very strict about the amount of time dogs are being left for, mainly because a lot of dogs are in rescue for that very reason.
Good luck, what ever you decide.
Ted doodle

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Bid
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Re: Working full time with a Labradoodle?

Post by Bid » 27 Oct 2014, 22:28

Chelle46 wrote:Bid as you are a member of the friends of Doodle trust I would of assumed you would know the trust takes into account the working patterens of everybody who applies to adopt a dog!
Chelle, I only know what it says on the website, I am not party to how the decisions are made.
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Brodie_Dog
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Re: Working full time with a Labradoodle?

Post by Brodie_Dog » 28 Oct 2014, 12:27

Ive been both sides of this fence with different breeds of dog so heres my opinion on it.

My previous dog was a boxer staff cross that was rescued when she was about six to eight months old.
At that time I was married and worked full time but my wife worked just around the corner, and went home for lunchtimes so the dog was never alone for more than about four hours at a time. The dog was very insecure at first, and luckily we lived in a house that we were were renovating. The dog, still very much a puppy was confined to the large kitchen when it was alone.
We were lucky, she was never a chewer, but it took a while to house train her to hold on when we were not there.
I had a friend who did the same thing and the dog stripped the wallpaper off the walls and chewed the kitchen units.
That said both my dog and theirs calmed down and settled in as they got older and became very calm happy dogs who were perfectly able to be left alone in this manner.

Years later our situation changed when my wife passed away after a long illness. I wasnt prepared to rehome my dog who was my closest companion and stopped me getting lonely, but I did still have to work and so the dog ended up being left alone for about 8 and a half hours a day monday to friday. By this time she was about 8 years old and was very calm, and one day out of interest I hooked up a web cam to see what she did while I was out. About five minutes after I was gone she curled up on the sofa and literally didnt move until about five minutes before I came home when she transferred to her bed. All dogs are different though and not all dogs are as calm as she was.
I was never really happy leaving her alone for that long though, and I had a dog flap fitted in the back door and after that she was able to go out into the garden whenever she wanted and on warm days would lie in the sun on the patio. But again I was lucky in the respect that she was not a barky dog and didnt make any noise.

As for Labradoodles, Ive now had Brodie for almost four years, and shes is like a spring most of the time with no off switch. The complete polar opposite of my previous calm laid back dog.
My current partner works part time so the dog is never alone for more than a couple of hours, and our son is always home from school just after three.
Unfortunately, we are sadly in the process of separating and so I am once again faced with this dilemma.
This time because of Brodies temperament and young energy, while she wont soil in the house, it wont be long before she is bouncing off the walls...
Once again though I am lucky in as much as I live in a rural area and get on very well with all my village neighbors (unlike when I lived in London and didnt even know most of my neighbors), most of whom have dogs. So all my neighbors have my door keys and the neighbors daughter comes in with her dog and lets them both run around the garden for half an hour which gives Brodie the energy release she needs until I get home. Although I usually have a kitchen of muddy footprints to clean up when I get home.

So the bottom line if this is your situation:
Its arguably not ideal, but its certainly doable so long as you are prepared to clear up lots of mess.
If you have carpets in the room where the new puppy will be, plan on replacing them for tiles.
If its an older house trained dog, make sure there are plenty of dog toys (brodie has a large rocking egg that will drop a biscuit out of a hole in the side if she manages to tip it at just the right angle which keeps her occupied for hours).
If you get on with your neighbors, they are a godsend.
And of course your mileage is going to vary greatly depending on how chilled out or manic your dog is.

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