Putting fear of dogs into children?

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Sooty
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Re: Putting fear of dogs into children?

Post by Sooty » 17 Mar 2008, 20:32

Re the school idea. I took Mac in when he was only 7 weeks old and he has always been great with children. I think the teacher was taking a chance though because of the possible allergy complaints. I guess it would need to be a pre signed permission thing but i think its a great idea.
Mac does howver scare the living daylights out of people when he bounces vertically on his lead as he jumps way past my head. They gravitate towards Tanya who is much smaller but can actually be a nippy sweetie to some dogs but not people where Mac is just a bundle of hairy love.

mhvj
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Re: Putting fear of dogs into children?

Post by mhvj » 17 Mar 2008, 22:58

With my old Newfie, it was very important because he cut a quite imposing figure. I trained him to freeze when he was approached and then took hold of his collar until I established that they would be happy for him to approach and then released him or walked him on.


How did you train him to do that? I would love to train Ruby not to bound up to kids and flatten them. I am worried she might give a small child a dog phobia for life.

Vicky

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wet.dog70
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Re: Putting fear of dogs into children?

Post by wet.dog70 » 18 Mar 2008, 12:28

Vicky,
It wasn't easy as my Newfie, Hudson was bouncy with a capital BOOOIIIIINNNGGG! :shock: As a puppy of 6 months plus he would jump on other dogs or people to play, covering people with mud and slobber and making dogs pretty grumpy too :( He was by this stage bigger than the average lab so we had to take the matter in hand :oops:
I tried and tried to break his intense fascination with living toys by trying to call him away but this did not work but I noticed that he always froze when he saw another dog or people approaching. I decided to use that and gave him a 'wait' command every time he did it and reward him with praise when I got there. Eventually I could get him to 'wait' without moving even if another dog was bouncing all over him. Then I could calmly walk up to him and grasp his collar as the other group approached and ask if they wanted him to play or not. If 'yes', I said 'say hello' and released him to play or otherwise I walked away saying 'go on' which was his command to leave well alone and carry on up the track. It looked good but it was a lot of work to get there. Underneath, Hudson was a big bouncy hooligan; it was sheer bloodimindedness that got him in check, it took until he was about 3 to get there but Newfies are slow to grow up. But it goes to show that it can be done. I also had to impress on him who was the Boss, by ignoring him when I first got home, generally being aloof. When he was off-lead I would walk off when he wasn't watching so he had to keep an eye on me at all times. Otherwise he would just ignore me (you know: selective hearing). But mainly I concentrated on a behaviour he already showed: (the wait) and built on that. I'm sure an expert would just build up a good recall and do it that way and probably a lot quicker. It was a triumph of stubborness with no grace on my part :roll:
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bigpaws
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Re: Putting fear of dogs into children?

Post by bigpaws » 19 Mar 2008, 22:30

Everyone seems to think my doodle looks like a character out off a Disney movie. Unfortunately children want to stroke him and run towards him .
He is very large jumps has the odd nibble so you can understand I am not to comfortable him being around small children.
I make him sit when children or prams go past move into drives etc and still parents let there children run at him to stroke and hug him and glare at me when I say don't stroke him.
They would be the first to moan if he knocked their toddlers over.
I have had people thank me for moving over on to the kerb and making my dog sit whilst they walk past. They say it is very scary to have a large dog walking towards you especially if old or with children.
I don't know about children being scared of dogs I am scared of children whilst with my dog I am scared stiff he will knock one over. :shock:

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hitthebongo
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Re: Putting fear of dogs into children?

Post by hitthebongo » 20 Mar 2008, 11:26

Most of the kids (and adults) that we meet are gobsmacked at what is walking towards them. Ted (or Oscar as he was known when we first got him) absolutley loves the attention and fuss so he's fantastic about letting anyone approach and stroke and cuddle him. If I see a child is a little wary I sit Ted down and ask them if they think he would feel furrry like a dog or wooly like a sheep, then tell them reasuringly to come and see for themselves. Ted loves all the fuss and the kids are usually surprised at their findings. :shock:
look at me ! im ted .

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