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6 months old and get quite aggressive and bites.

Posted: 30 Mar 2015, 22:01
by daisy2014
My 6 month old doodle Daisy is really testing us at the moment She's just jumping up at everyone and get really aggressive and biting She's aiming a lot of it at me at the moment sometimes I can end up in tears Cox she just won't stop and she hurts sometimes. We honestly dont no what to do she has lots of toys she can bite and we pay her attention and take her for walK's but we don't no Wot else to do coz at first the walks seem to stop her coz she was tired but now they don't seem to work. Do anyone have any ideas to help up PLEASE

Re: 6 months old and get quite aggressive and bites.

Posted: 31 Mar 2015, 08:23
by Bid
It sounds to me like a nippy puppy who hasn't learnt to control her self yet - has she always nipped at your hands? Do you go to training classes at all? At 6 months they are are at a difficult age as they are bursting with energy but still not allowed to go on long walks, so they need things to do to occupy them. Training is a great way of tiring out a pup who is full of energy, and a good trainer will be able to give you all sorts of hints and tips.

To work on the jumping and biting at home then wearing a house line can help - a lightweight lead permanently on the collar. WHen she jumps you can then stand on the lead to stop her and use your command for no jumping (don't use the word "down" if that is what you use for lie down, as that confuses them - I use "off"). You can also use the house line to lead her to her quiet place without getting your hands too close to the bitey bit!

Often the over the top biting and jumping is what they do when they are too tired but don't know it. Does Daisy have a crate? If so then that is the time to take her to her crate with a stuffed kong - I used to keep a supply of konge filled with meat or yoghurt in the freezer for these occasions - it's not a punishment but an opportunity for her to relax. Chewing releases soothing endorphins which helps the relaxation.

My Daisy was a really bitey girl - it turns out she is a particularly clever dog and so needed a lot of things to occupy her. Bizarrely this is when I taught her to play tuggy. It's a game that needs strict rules but helps with biting. The rules are #1 - play stops the second teeth touch skin - the tug toy is put away and I leave the scene. #2 - Daisy was allowed to win sometimes, but had to bring the toy back - I started with Daisy on a loose lead so she couldn't run off and destroy the tug toy. #3 - the tug toy was only used for this game, it was mine and not hers and she never got to play with it on her own. Daisy absolutely loved this game (and still does) and it enabled me to introduce the "no bite" command once she got the hang of the game stopping when she nipped me. (I would recommend using something else though as it scares people when I say "no bite" when what I really mean is "softly" :roll: )

Re: 6 months old and get quite aggressive and bites.

Posted: 31 Mar 2015, 10:38
by Watty
I have always found making a high pitched yelping sound very effective, each time she bites, instantly make a high pitched yelp, this lets her know that she has hurt you, otherwise, she will just presume she is playing with you, as they do in the litter play fighting, but a high yelp means you've hurt me.

Re: 6 months old and get quite aggressive and bites.

Posted: 31 Mar 2015, 16:00
by Pshopper
Sound advice from everyone, and I would also add that what has worked for us (and still continues to do) is playing brain games.

Walking physically tires them out, but it helps as well to get their brains working.
A book that I can recommend is..

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Brain-Games-Dog ... s+for+dogs

Also, it does sound like she may be getting a bit over tired; a bit like a toddler when they start behaving in a fractious and irritable way. :oops:

Good luck.h

Re: 6 months old and get quite aggressive and bites.

Posted: 31 Mar 2015, 17:09
by daisy2014
Bid wrote:It sounds to me like a nippy puppy who hasn't learnt to control her self yet - has she always nipped at your hands? Do you go to training classes at all? At 6 months they are are at a difficult age as they are bursting with energy but still not allowed to go on long walks, so they need things to do to occupy them. Training is a great way of tiring out a pup who is full of energy, and a good trainer will be able to give you all sorts of hints and tips.

To work on the jumping and biting at home then wearing a house line can help - a lightweight lead permanently on the collar. WHen she jumps you can then stand on the lead to stop her and use your command for no jumping (don't use the word "down" if that is what you use for lie down, as that confuses them - I use "off"). You can also use the house line to lead her to her quiet place without getting your hands too close to the bitey bit!

Often the over the top biting and jumping is what they do when they are too tired but don't know it. Does Daisy have a crate? If so then that is the time to take her to her crate with a stuffed kong - I used to keep a supply of konge filled with meat or yoghurt in the freezer for these occasions - it's not a punishment but an opportunity for her to relax. Chewing releases soothing endorphins which helps the relaxation.

My Daisy was a really bitey girl - it turns out she is a particularly clever dog and so needed a lot of things to occupy her. Bizarrely this is when I taught her to play tuggy. It's a game that needs strict rules but helps with biting. The rules are #1 - play stops the second teeth touch skin - the tug toy is put away and I leave the scene. #2 - Daisy was allowed to win sometimes, but had to bring the toy back - I started with Daisy on a loose lead so she couldn't run off and destroy the tug toy. #3 - the tug toy was only used for this game, it was mine and not hers and she never got to play with it on her own. Daisy absolutely loved this game (and still does) and it enabled me to introduce the "no bite" command once she got the hang of the game stopping when she nipped me. (I would recommend using something else though as it scares people when I say "no bite" when what I really mean is "softly" :roll: )
my daisy doesn't have a crate wish she did but I don't think she'd do well with it now. ive put her a lightweight lead in the house and shes feeling very sorry for herself, but shes not jumped up yet. we're going to a beginners handling course in a week, so hopefully that will help.

Re: 6 months old and get quite aggressive and bites.

Posted: 31 Mar 2015, 17:40
by sunshine57
Sorry to hear you are going through this I had to put up with it until Beau was about 7 months and it is ok for it to be called puppy nipping but it does not feel like nipping it bloody hurts I used to come close to tears as it was mainly me he would bite yet he would always want to be with me to be honest all the ouching turning away and such never stopped Beau in the end I would shout at him stop it ! And if he carried on I would say THAT DOES IT! really loud and he would looked shocked and stop. Even to this day he take notice of the that does it . Like the other night he pinched a dropped piece of bread and would not drop it I was not going to let him have it as it had not been given to him I tried drop it leave it no luck the moment I said that does it he dropped it and stepped back . There is light at the end of the tunnel at that age they are like a naughty toddler give the shouting stop it or that does it a go I know they are all different but who knows it might work I still bare the scars from some of the so called puppy nipping so my thoughts are with you good luck.
Sue & Beau

Re: 6 months old and get quite aggressive and bites.

Posted: 31 Mar 2015, 19:49
by Pshopper
What about trying time out with Daisy when she is being very boisterous?

Jak used to have his manic time normally in the evening when he was a pup and sometimes we would all get a bit fed up with it. We all tried squealing loudly when he would be a bit bitey but this only excited him all the more :? So we changed tactics...

He would do something unacceptable and we said NO to him and then calmly but firmly lead him into the kitchen and shut the door for only 1 minute. If he barked, we wouldn't let him back in until he had stopped.
We then allowed him to come back into the room with the family, but if he repeated whatever he had done, we would once again lead him out.

They soon learn as they are such sociable bright dogs and want to be with you and I think the key is keeping calm but letting her know that you are in charge and not her.

I wish there was a one size remedy that fits all but sadly not; so keep trying all the suggestions and you will find something that works for you and Daisy.

Re: 6 months old and get quite aggressive and bites.

Posted: 25 Apr 2015, 08:09
by bjellys
I have Mollie and her her singleton pup Flossie .
Flossie is 5 months old now and has been through this biting thing and all we have ever done is to hold her down firmly on the floor so she cannot move and calmly tell her to stop and calm down,she soon realised who was in charge.it seems to me that if you give them one sniff that you are nervous or a soft touch they will show dominance .
Once Flossie has submitted we say what a good girl she is and make a fuss of her.
I also find that training should be a natural thing same thing day in day out we play with Flossie but never get her into a frenzy and always try to make it fun .
When Flossie has her food she like a Labrador eats very fast so we just give a small amount of food at a time and then tell her to go back and sit then put some more in the bowl and so on she quickly learns so now just eats the food and sits back and waits.
The other thing is to get them socialising with lots of other dogs off the lead so that they know how to behave when out ,we take the 2 dogs in places like Costa coffee and restaurants and they have to lay down and be good while we are there.
the same goes for barking we stop her barking when it is just to get her own way we let it go a couple of barks if it guarding thing.

Re: 6 months old and get quite aggressive and bites.

Posted: 25 Apr 2015, 22:43
by Bid
Pinning a dog down is an approach that used to be recommended when people still believed that dogs were trying to dominate us - it is a hangover from the days when it was thought that wolves behaved that way. Research has shown that to be a false premise, and these days the dominance myth has more or less gone from modern dog training thank goodness (apart from cesar Milan :roll: ). Pinning a dog down and "alpha rolling" is actually a dangerous thing to do to a dog. It may work in the short term, but what it actually does is make the dog feel threatened. Not only that, but you are at the same time removing his preferred action to a threat - flight. After a few times (with a good tempered dog) he will know what to expect and will give a warning growl. If you persist in pinning the dog down then after a few more times the dog won't bother with the warning and will go straight to a bite, and when you pin a dog down your face is pretty close to the dogs face.