Some info needed

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Liz!!
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Joined: 07 Oct 2012, 15:22

Re: Some info needed

Post by Liz!! » 06 Jul 2015, 23:24

Hi - I did a lot of research into ESN and have a mini Aussie Doodle.

The only real thing i could find against it was a slightly raised risk of bladder incontinence when old (this can happen in all spayed bitches) and it can be helped by pills, and a problem with an inverted vulva.

A lot of female dogs are born with a vulva that has not fully popped out of the body - at first season, it swells and this rights itself. If the dog has been spayed already, obviously they will still have the inverted vulva, which can form a well that retains urine which can irritate, and could possibly lead to bladder infections.

Our dog does have this, but it has not caused any problems.

The point about osteosarcoma? This is the most common form of cancer in dogs. It mostly effects large, heavy breeds. The next cohort it affects? Dogs that have NOT been spayed or neutered, ie intact male and female dogs.
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Lola is a UK Assistance Dog, trained to alert me for low blood sugar by Medical Detection Dogs (http://www.medicaldetectiondogs.org.uk)

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Bid
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Re: Some info needed

Post by Bid » 07 Jul 2015, 00:15

I disagree Liz - there are so many papers being published showing the increased occurance of various cancers including osteosasrcoma in early neutered dogs. You can have a scroll through google scholar to see the research, or you can have a look at this summary of both pros and cons of neutering and the associated risks ... http://www.naiaonline.org/pdfs/LongTerm ... InDogs.pdf
www.dogtrekker.co.uk
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Liz!!
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Re: Some info needed

Post by Liz!! » 07 Jul 2015, 09:23

Just read that, Bid. So you'd need to wait until after the dog was one year old to neuter to also avoid that risk. And then neuter to avoid the greater risk of osteosarcoma (because not being neutered is the second highest cause of osteosarcoma in large medium to large dogs).

It does not say that ESN increases the risk over neutering before one year old.

Most vets would be very worried about leaving a female dog for two seasons before neutering, because owners seem absolutely unable to keep their dog in th ehouse while they are fertile. You can be overcome by a male dog out on a walk, easily. Even on here I see people saying they have been walking their dog 'during quiet times'.

It's all risky, that's the problem.
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Lola is a UK Assistance Dog, trained to alert me for low blood sugar by Medical Detection Dogs (http://www.medicaldetectiondogs.org.uk)

Ianto!
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Re: Some info needed

Post by Ianto! » 07 Jul 2015, 22:49

I wonder whether Peter's visit this weekend has helped him to decide whether a Doodle is the dog for his family?
Anne, Ianto & Wyre x

pmac1985
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Joined: 01 Jul 2015, 11:35

Re: Some info needed

Post by pmac1985 » 27 Aug 2015, 20:52

Hi sorry forgot about this. At the moment its been put on hold.

My wife actually liked them a lot more than expected and my kids were crying when we left as they thought the puppys we saw were to take home :(

The breeders were very good and allowed us to see lots of different dogs but my wife still had worries regarding our yearly 3 week trip away and with some other things. The prices was also an issue, we have still to try my daughter with another dog to see if it bothers her and if it doesn't we may look for another breed. we have seen a few cockapoos recently and couldn't tell much difference, plus there 1/3 the price.

Liz!!
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Joined: 07 Oct 2012, 15:22

Re: Some info needed

Post by Liz!! » 27 Aug 2015, 21:16

Hello - I have an Aussie Doodle.

Suebedo is mistaken about the reason for non-shedding or very low shedding.

Hair growth happens at different rates. A lab's coat sheds when the hair is very short. It has a very short life span and therefore you will notice the coat shedding a lot...it can be excessively short, some labs you can actually see the hair drop off them.

A poodle's hair has a very long life span. It does drop into the coat - but not a lot, as the life span is so long, it simply doesn't shed much at all.

An Aussie doodle is very similar. Most of them don't seem to shed at all. I can brush Lola sometimes, often in fact, and nothing at all comes out. If the same amount of hair was being shed as with a labrador, then I'd get hair out every time, even if it dropped into the coat.

Sometimes I brush her and a little comes out - most noticeably her ears and tail, where the hair is longer and presumably is more likely to have reached its lifespan.

The difference is she has to be cut every 3 months as her hair carries on growing because it doesn't fall out.

She is early ESN, but the jury is out as to whether this is worse than getting it done later - the truth is more that some cancers are prevented by spaying at all, some are made more likely, but on the whole it is safer not to neuter at all. Except for the danger of getting pregnant. Later spaying is a dangerous operation. I know people who have lost bitches during or after this op.

The one thing that is a problem is some bitches can be born with an inverted vulva, that hasn't fully emerged from the body. At first season, this usually puts itself right by popping out as it swells. A bitch that has been ESN will not have this opportunity if they have no season. With vets increasingly spaying before the first season and many vets seemingly unaware of this problem, this could occur anyhow.

Lola does not shed any hair round the house at all, and also does not smell, even when wet, another upside to Aussie doods. I feel that's what I am paying for. It was worth it! Aussie doods (although this is not always the case) are usually calmer than English crosses.

Lola is my assistance dog and is fabulously calm (although she has her moments!).
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Lola is a UK Assistance Dog, trained to alert me for low blood sugar by Medical Detection Dogs (http://www.medicaldetectiondogs.org.uk)

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Ben
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Re: Some info needed

Post by Ben » 27 Aug 2015, 22:55

I breed Australian Labradoodles, and yes they are expensive, but a lot of money does go into health tests, stud fees, rearing a puppy well etc...

What I would like to point out is that allergies are not just about the coat but also saliva and dander related too.

Out of four families who visited me with allergy concerns, two families were fine with the aussie doods, and two families were not.

Look at different breeds, maybe attend Discover Dogs in March to see other possible breeds, and make sure that the family member really touched an adult dog and puppy and has no reaction over the next few hours before you proceed.

Maybe look at the poodle, bichon, Spanish Water Dog, Lagotto to list a few.

www.northboundaustralianlabradoodles.com
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suebedo
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Re: Some info needed

Post by suebedo » 30 Aug 2015, 17:43

This is the link to the doodle trust website which talk about the allergy issue and also about shedding.

http://www.doodletrust.com/education/doodle-alergy-myth
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