Tall Chocolate Miniature Poodle Stud

Use this area if you are thinking of breeding from your dog and are looking for a suitable 'partner'!
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PennyAli
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Post by PennyAli » 11 Feb 2007, 20:45

I have offered Bailey as a stud to Canine Partners
Last edited by PennyAli on 28 Jun 2007, 13:15, edited 1 time in total.

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Jakester61
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Post by Jakester61 » 11 Feb 2007, 21:19

I think that Lisa's dedication to miniature labradoodles is admirable and clearly she has their best interests at heart.
Along with our own line of minature labradoodles we are importing "Angus" a 6th generation minature Australian labradoodle and hope to work alongside with other breeders and widen the gene pool and develope this breed.
I would like to thank Lisa for all her kind help, guidance, support and knowledge she has freely given when I asked for help. I was'nt seen as competiton or a threat and Lisa was so lovely and helpful. I look forward to working together in the future. :D

Jackie
Tora's Australian Labradoodles
http://www.australian-labradoodles.co.uk

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Labradorable
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Post by Labradorable » 13 Feb 2007, 10:31

I agree with Jackie about Lisa's dedication to miniature labradoodles. The thread you initially referred to didn't mention any names so I honestly don't think it can be viewed as a personal attack. The reference to the 'dark side' isn't aimed at you personally, it's kind of an ongoing reference used by some of us with regards to something completely different (but obviously you don't know that so it was understandably misunderstood).

Most people on both sites you referred to are more dedicated to Labradoodles and possibly Goldendoodles as opposed to poodle X anything and everything. Don't get me wrong, I'm not suggesting you are pro poodle x the first person who comes along with a stud fee, I just think that when you see sites such as epupz where poodles have been crossed with the likes of GSD, Rotweillers and even Chinese Crested dogs, :shock: that most people who are genuinely interested in the best interests of our lovely breed are understandably concerned and possibly somewhat guarded when we see and hear the most awful stories about puppy farmers and god knows what else.

Thanks for the link to your site, Rupert is just gorgeous and I'm sure will be much in demand.

LouBeale
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Post by LouBeale » 13 Feb 2007, 20:23

I don't have a problem with cross breeding as long as the best interests of the offspring is taken into account and it is not just done to make money. Obviously there are certain breeds that should not and cannot be crossed for health and temperament reasons. ie. pitbulls/bulldogs, pikanese/pugs (apparently their eyes could fall out), certain large breed dogs (could be lame from birth) etc. etc. etc. You need to have specialist knowledge at the outset and have carefully researched the characteristics of your breeds in depth before undertaking such breeding.

Labradoodles have been around for a number of years now and a great deal of research has been undertaken already. Obviously, the odd problems can crop up (as with any new breed), but generally they are a healthy and well suited cross (despite all the anti/designer dog stuff you read about in the press). It has now been proven that the anti-allergy, non shedding side of the breed is hit and miss, but it doesn't stop them being a lovely family pet for many other reasons to those who are not necessarily looking for specific attributes.

I don't agree with the high prices, as I have already said on many occasions, but that is down to individuals to dictate and the more people who say no to the ridiculous prices, then the better for the breed and it's reputation IMO.

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PennyAli
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Post by PennyAli » 14 Feb 2007, 08:55

You need to have specialist knowledge at the outset and have carefully researched the characteristics of your breeds in depth before undertaking such breeding.

exactly :D :D
Last edited by PennyAli on 28 Jun 2007, 13:16, edited 1 time in total.

eleanor
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Post by eleanor » 15 Feb 2007, 14:47

Just to add an aside to the original posting on here, I was informed by Hearing Dogs for the Deaf when they accepted one of my own F1 labradoodle pups for training (she later failed - too excitable!) that they had received a considerable quantity of hate mail from breeders when it became known that they were crossing miniature poodles to cocker spaniels in an attempt to produce small, friendly, trainable dogs. Notwithstanding the views of those breeders, the cockerpoos they bred have proved to be extremely adept, with about 40 of them having so far passed the scheme. This compares to just one (yes, one) successful labradoodle.

I concur with everything that has been said about the real need deaf people have for suitable dogs - not only to act as their ears around the house but also to help erode the isolation which is often the lot of the deaf. I have personal knowledge of this since my own mother was deaf and she died (of a heart attack eight years ago, aged 71) whilst on the waiting list for a trained dog. She had been on that list for over a year and was nowhere near the top of it.

Hearing Dogs remains desperately short of suitable dogs for training and, as many of their potential recipients are elderly like my mother, they also prefer their canine trainees to be smallish with easy-care coats. They are very interested, in fact, in a pup from my chocolate labrador bitch - who has an ideal temperament for an assistance dog - but I admit to being torn between mating her to a FT-type lab to produce a competition dog for me or going for a miniature poodle (or even a cockerpoo cross) to produce potential pups for them. Choices, choices!

Incidentally, on the subject of crossbreeding in general, the GDBA has been crossing labs with golden retrievers for some 30 years now, and I believe that about 60% of their homebred dogs are now F1 crosses between these two breeds. Many serious working trials and agility trainers also use judicious cross-mating to try to produce an ideal blend of characteristics; the GSD/collie cross being a particularly common one (as are the Springador and the Sprocker in the gundog world). The most successful-ever cross, in terms of competition wins, was that produced by the Melnola kennels some ten years ago. Starting out with pure working golden retrievers, they crossed a bitch of this line with an Ob Ch collie/flatcoat retriever. The bitch they kept from the litter became a WT Ch and, when bred to a WT Ch border collie, she produced no less than four individual WT champions from one litter. Two of these were multiple CC winners and two also qualified PAT dogs. So far as I know, that is a record number of champions to be produced from any one litter in any of the show or working disciplines.

To me, it doesn't matter what you breed to what, so long as both parents are of outstanding temperament, come from good families, have been checked for relevant hereditary defects and the resulting pups are reared with knowledge and love. At the end of the day, a dog is just a dog and a good one is beyond price, whatever its ancestry.

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Carole g
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Post by Carole g » 16 Feb 2007, 11:01

I keep agreeing with you, Eleanor (this has got to stop!)
Large bouncy dogs are not an obvious choice for the elderly disabled, and the vast majority of disabled are elderly. Your mother and my old girl too wanted a smaller dog to be a true companion, probably something that can go on a lap and is happy with repetitive tasks. Your average (both sexes, roughly) 25" labradoodle or indeed standard poodle is too large and even that special dog suitable for disabled training is not for the older handler. The well trained dog will need play periods and a large poodle/doodle's sheer love of life and good tempered exuberance is not for all.
ALWAYS visit the premises and see mum with pup. There are no excuses!
DONT BUY FROM PUPPY HARMERS
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eleanor
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Post by eleanor » 16 Feb 2007, 13:43

There has to be a cure for agreeingitis, Carole - but so long as you're agreeing with ME, what's the problem? :D

Just to show what a bum steer I gave Hearing Dogs with my donated pup, I told them that I was pretty sure she would remain small (she was by far the smallest pup born to a 20" labrador mum and a 22-23" standard poodle dad) and that I had every hope her coat would be low-shedding, since it was of a lovely soft, crushed velvet texture at 7 weeks. By ten months old, when she was rejected on account of exuberance, she was already over 22" tall and her coat had become wiry and coarse - though still very attractive, it cast hair by the shedload!

After she had appeared in the big ring at Crufts last year, as part of the Hearing Dogs display, her handler was approached by many members of the public who wanted to stroke her and ask about the breed. Virtually all of them said something like, "Oh, these are the dogs that don't moult, aren't they?" - some of them even whilst they were being sprayed with hair from her violently-wagging tail. It just goes to show how deepy-ingrained this myth has become in the minds of ordinary folk; quite baffling really.

Incidentally, of the six pups from that litter, three shed more heavily than their labrador mother, two about the same and only one markedly less. Luckily that one went to someone who already owned an F1 doodle and has quite enough hair to contend with from that one. As I've said before, none of them went to people with dog allergies, since selling a half-lab to anyone who reacts badly to dog hair is simply barmy in my view.

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Carole g
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Post by Carole g » 16 Feb 2007, 14:16

on with the agreeing!
"Oh, these are the dogs that don't moult, aren't they?"
Its worse than that! Ive had people telling me that they cannot have an SP , they must have a doodle because it is hypoallergenic and they have allergies! I honestly think that they thought I was having them on when I told them thre truth
ALWAYS visit the premises and see mum with pup. There are no excuses!
DONT BUY FROM PUPPY HARMERS
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PennyAli
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Post by PennyAli » 16 Feb 2007, 14:50

I think we should love them for what they are :D
Last edited by PennyAli on 28 Jun 2007, 13:17, edited 1 time in total.

SamandRupert
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Post by SamandRupert » 16 Feb 2007, 17:23

Hi eleanor, thankyou for your honesty, I met up with my BSL stage 1 tutor Fiona Drummond and a number of deaf friends and BSL students. They reinforced the need that HDFD had finding suitable pups, and low to non moulting were ideal candidates. Also by advertising Rupert I was inadvertinally advertising for them. I have received quite a few emails in support.
Also as my Standard Poodle "Lucy" is qualified as a pat dog, I knew the kind of temprement that would be needed when I bought Rupert.
Yesterday was Ruperts first mating to a labrador, no assistance was needed<lol> and the owner of the lab is going to talk through with her partner about donating a pup to Support Dogs for the Disabled. I don't force people to donate I just give them facts.
This forum is a scary place but I do understand the need to put off puppy farmers, but I also think a little help and GOOD advice to new breeders is a positive thing. After all we were all newbies once. Lisa has given me some excellent advice and I'm very gratefull and honered to call her a friend! :D

p.s The person who bought the labrador to me has a Sister with a 2yr old Cavalier bitch who's in season next month! :)

p.p.s Rupert is infact 16.5 inches tall...stupid husband was measuring. :roll:
Last edited by SamandRupert on 28 Jun 2007, 13:12, edited 2 times in total.

CAROL SHAW
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Post by CAROL SHAW » 17 Feb 2007, 01:03

Hi back tracking to Hearing Dogs I also gave them a puppy that was rejected at 12 weeks as thought to be too BIG they want small mongrels from the rescue places if possible but never mind they are doing a good job

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PennyAli
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Post by PennyAli » 17 Feb 2007, 11:16

Sam,

have you offered Rupert’s services to them as that way they chose appropriate approved bitches that have already proved them self’s and will hopefully produce some thing suitable for them
Last edited by PennyAli on 28 Jun 2007, 13:18, edited 1 time in total.

SamandRupert
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Post by SamandRupert » 17 Feb 2007, 16:42

Please, if you have any more queries, use the links. http://www.hearingdogs.org.uk/supporting-us.php edit due to link not working.
Edit due to stupidness! :D
Last edited by SamandRupert on 28 Jun 2007, 12:26, edited 1 time in total.

Sharon
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Post by Sharon » 17 Feb 2007, 17:03

Hi Sam,

Are you happy to consider any poodle X or do you have only certain breeds that you will allow to be mated to your min poodle ?

You must have a vast knowledge, nevertheless, of not only min poodle health but the health of all those breeds you are prepared to cross to. The mind boggles and I certainly don't envy you !


Is there a reason as to why a min poodle could not be used as a hearing dog or do they prefer them to have been crossed with something else, and if so why ? Especially as you mention they prefer them to be low-non shedding.

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