Breeding , is it for you?

Use this area if you are thinking of breeding from your dog and are looking for a suitable 'partner'!
LouBeale
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Joined: 21 Feb 2006, 19:38
Location: Kent

Re: Breeding , is it for you?

Post by LouBeale » 09 Jan 2010, 16:02

I have to say i have been very blessed so far, but I have witnessed a mumified pup and one with breathing difficulties, my Vet is always on hand for me and I don't mind the cost involved just need to make sure my puppies are all healthy and well and I give them all my time because it is important :-)

techiebabe
Posts: 449
Joined: 23 Feb 2013, 02:11

Re: Breeding , is it for you?

Post by techiebabe » 29 Aug 2013, 16:44

This is a really interesting thread.

Ive had my beloved Commodore for nearly 3 months now, he is 4.5 months old. I am amazed when neighbours and friends meet him that many of them say 'are you going to breed him?' which is something that never happened with my greyhound.

I know he is wonderful, and that Commodore clones would no doubt be adorable and popular, but that's no reason to breed! I suppose it would be easier for me as he is a boy, but Ive read so much about the process and pitfalls of breeding and I cant imagine how strong and resilient youd have to be, both physically and mentally, to go through the process.

When Commodore's parents were expecting, I was curious, and read up on the process. I found this site fascinating: http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/showdogs/br ... ducing.htm - warning, contains some heartbreaking photos. That's the first page, links are at the bottom. It is really interesting, shows and discusses all stages of breeding, but also has some cautionary tales including pics of water puppies, deformed puppies and rotting puppies that died in the womb. I think anyone thinking of breeding should have to read every page of that site first. Of course there are some cute photos too, but it's not all fluffy.

Anyway, I always say 'no, I couldnt breed him, as it's not something I agreed with his breeder' which means I dont get criticised for saying no because it looks like it wasnt my choice. But honestly? If I wanted to breed dogs, I would consider that when buying a puppy. Commodore is wonderful, great nature, great shape, rock solid... but it is shocking to me that people seem to assume that if you have a lovely pet, you can simply breed them and make more the same. Ive heard neighbours say they want to have 'just one or two litters' from their pet dog because they love it so much and want to share it. I couldnt love Commodore more, he is just what I wanted. But he is my companion, not a puppy machine. I am amazed when people casually ask if I will breed him and seriously expect that I might say yes. Do people not realise what a responsibility it is?

(This is not to disrespect those who have thought carefully about breeding, and done the health checks and research; without lovely considerate people like that, I wouldnt have Commodore! But it shocks me how casual so many people seem to be about it.)

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Bid
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Re: Breeding , is it for you?

Post by Bid » 29 Aug 2013, 17:36

I've never wanted to be a breeder, and now I know for sure that I don't, because I've seen the heartbreak it can bring. I've had to ring a breeder and tell her that a pup she bred has got hip dysplasia, and I've had to return a puppy to a breeder as it has joint issues. (On both occasions the breeder was understandably upset - not because of me but on the puppy's behalf. With the returned puppy we both went to the vet together and she told us that the puppy had to be an only dog and this breeder moved heaven and earth to find her a home what could deal with her problem, and gave them the puppy with the promise to pay for surgery when she needed it.) There was the lovely caring breeder who had to ring me and tell me that the little puppy I had chosen and visited had died in spite of her careful nursing, and many of us on here held our breath while Bridget did her best to make sure all the Snuggles puppies survived, and cried with her when the littlest one didn't make it. So no, it's not for me, but I am thankful that there are breeders like these ones I have met, who breed with such care and attention, and who bring their puppies into the world and nurture them with a whole lot of love.
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Beauty without vanity, strength without insolence, courage without ferocity, and all the virtues of man without his vices - Byron

suebedo
Posts: 1824
Joined: 23 Mar 2013, 23:40
Location: Denham, South Bucks

Re: Breeding , is it for you?

Post by suebedo » 29 Aug 2013, 18:02

Having a boy and a girl, it is a question that I get most times we meet new people. Every time I say no, I don't know enough about them brings a puzzled look. They do look adorable together and in my Disney moments I think "oh wouldn't it be lovely" but reality hits home very quickly and I bump back down to earth!

Florence was spayed earlier than I wanted simply to ensure that we didn't have an unplanned mishap, especially as I know nothing of Fozzie's history and only one half of Florence's detailed history.

I love my two puppies dearly but breeding is not for me, it was worrying enough when a stray cat moved in with us on the day that she gave birth to 2 beautiful kittens, and she was (and still is) much more independent than any dog in the world.
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beeeerock

Re: Breeding , is it for you?

Post by beeeerock » 29 Aug 2013, 18:22

techiebabe wrote:This is a really interesting thread.

Ive had my beloved Commodore for nearly 3 months now, he is 4.5 months old. I am amazed when neighbours and friends meet him that many of them say 'are you going to breed him?' which is something that never happened with my greyhound.

I know he is wonderful, and that Commodore clones would no doubt be adorable and popular, but that's no reason to breed! I suppose it would be easier for me as he is a boy, but Ive read so much about the process and pitfalls of breeding and I cant imagine how strong and resilient youd have to be, both physically and mentally, to go through the process.

When Commodore's parents were expecting, I was curious, and read up on the process. I found this site fascinating: http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/showdogs/br ... ducing.htm - warning, contains some heartbreaking photos. That's the first page, links are at the bottom. It is really interesting, shows and discusses all stages of breeding, but also has some cautionary tales including pics of water puppies, deformed puppies and rotting puppies that died in the womb. I think anyone thinking of breeding should have to read every page of that site first. Of course there are some cute photos too, but it's not all fluffy.

Anyway, I always say 'no, I couldnt breed him, as it's not something I agreed with his breeder' which means I dont get criticised for saying no because it looks like it wasnt my choice. But honestly? If I wanted to breed dogs, I would consider that when buying a puppy. Commodore is wonderful, great nature, great shape, rock solid... but it is shocking to me that people seem to assume that if you have a lovely pet, you can simply breed them and make more the same. Ive heard neighbours say they want to have 'just one or two litters' from their pet dog because they love it so much and want to share it. I couldnt love Commodore more, he is just what I wanted. But he is my companion, not a puppy machine. I am amazed when people casually ask if I will breed him and seriously expect that I might say yes. Do people not realise what a responsibility it is?

(This is not to disrespect those who have thought carefully about breeding, and done the health checks and research; without lovely considerate people like that, I wouldnt have Commodore! But it shocks me how casual so many people seem to be about it.)
I agree, it is interesting. And I think you've hit on several of the main reasons why it's not to be taken lightly. Anyone wanting to do it because the puppies are just so cute, or the parents are just wonderful dogs, are doing it for the wrong reasons IMHO. Those reasons can only be secondary to an academic interest in genetics, and a tested ability to handle the real and significant emotional and physical work associated with breeding in a professional manner.

I saw this fairly close up when selecting a Havanese breeder and puppy for my folks. The gene pool for those dogs is less of a pool and more of a puddle - very few (like a dozen or so) actually got out of Cuba when Fidel took over. They have known health concerns and what I realized early on was that the breeding program the serious breeders involved themselves in was more about breeding out the problems to ensure healthy dogs than it was to get a particular colour or jaw line. Those aesthetic things were important, but not given greater importance than health. I'm sure some breeders don't work in quite that way, but the ones we researched certainly did.

The same concerns apply to breeding a doodle. The breeder needs to be concerned about the genetic history of the potential parents and cooperate with other breeders to keep the genetic pool as deep as possible - backyard breeders with a mating pair to churn out puppies isn't good practice in my opinion!

Bodhi is 1/8th German Shepherd... and that wasn't an accident. The breeder wanted to see if she could broaden the bone structure a little, while adding some genetic diversity. The first puppies from Bodhi's parents turned out so well she eventually bred the same pair again... and we got Bodhi. He looks like a Labradoodle, but I think he's more sturdy than typical and his height/weight so far seem to support this. We selected this breeder in part because she was 'designing' with the intention of building a better dog than you'd get from the typical puppy-mill breeders. The fact that she also clearly cared for all her dogs as pets and family rather than just breeding stock was the final deciding factor.

chornsby
Posts: 3
Joined: 31 May 2016, 20:56

Re: Breeding , is it for you?

Post by chornsby » 02 Jun 2016, 15:09

hi all! Hope your ok. I am new to this site. :)

I have a 7 month old f1b miniature labradoodle. We are considering studding him, however we have never done this before and wanted some advice of dos and don'ts! Any advice welcomed.

We also wondered if their temperament will change if we do stud him and don't get him Neuted?

Many thanks.

Claire Hornsby

Pollydoodle
Posts: 2228
Joined: 10 Sep 2010, 18:36

Re: Breeding , is it for you?

Post by Pollydoodle » 04 Jun 2016, 12:05

chornsby wrote:hi all! Hope your ok. I am new to this site. :)

I have a 7 month old f1b miniature labradoodle. We are considering studding him, however we have never done this before and wanted some advice of dos and don'ts! Any advice welcomed.

We also wondered if their temperament will change if we do stud him and don't get him Neuted?

Many thanks.

Claire Hornsby
Hi Claire, think a lot of info is in this thread already. He needs all the health tests same as the bitch. He is too young to stud for a responsible approach so you have at least a year to read up :wink: Main question only you can answer is why you want to put him to stud.

chornsby
Posts: 3
Joined: 31 May 2016, 20:56

Re: Breeding , is it for you?

Post by chornsby » 07 Jun 2016, 12:59

Thanks for the advice. Will have a good read through the threads.

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