Murphy has Epilepsy

An area to discuss any health concerns you may have in your dog or questions about health matters in general
Liz!!
Posts: 2099
Joined: 07 Oct 2012, 15:22

Re: Murphy has Epilepsy

Post by Liz!! » 07 Jan 2013, 22:01

Aww, that sounds horrid, poor old Murphy. Keeping my fingers crossed that it never happens again, and at the very least that Katherine's tips can help.
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Lola is a UK Assistance Dog, trained to alert me for low blood sugar by Medical Detection Dogs (http://www.medicaldetectiondogs.org.uk)

Vincento
Posts: 654
Joined: 26 Apr 2009, 22:15
Location: Norfolk

Re: Murphy has Epilepsy

Post by Vincento » 07 Jan 2013, 22:39

Wendy/Murphy....thank you for your post. Your description of the December incident reads almost as if I'd written it. The unable to stand/cowering/crawling/shaking and scared is exactly what we have witnessed. You describe Murphy wanting to run out of your lounge, Vince just wants come to us and be reassured.....on the one occasion we were able to get Vince into the garden he just collapsed onto the grass and panted...but seemed happy to be on the cool grass and recovered shortly afterwards. Also as you say they seem to happen when totally relaxed although we did have one happen about 30 mins into a walk and he just stopped cowered and looked worried for a couple of minutes. Vince is due his yearly jabs next month so I'll have another word with our vet. I too have looked at the internet they do all seem to read pretty much the same and as you say it doesn't take long before normality returns..still scary though even when you know what to expect. Thank you so much for sharing your knowledge and best wishes to Murphy ..Rae x

Vincento
Posts: 654
Joined: 26 Apr 2009, 22:15
Location: Norfolk

Re: Murphy has Epilepsy

Post by Vincento » 07 Jan 2013, 22:46

Rainbow wrote:Hi, sorry to hear about Murphy. My old terrier Gordon has suffered from fits ever since we got him ( he's a rescue whom we've had for 14 years, and they thought he was 3 or 4 when we got him!). The first time it happened it was really frightening but to be honest after all this time we have got used to it! His fits also seem to be when he is relaxed or asleep and his balance/legs go completely, he is generally sick after aswell! As he is so small we just scoop him up, keep him upright and comfort him and usually within minutes he kind of shakes his head as if to say 'what was that all about?'. We have taken him to the vets several times but they seem quite happy not to put him on medication. He seems to have about maybe 6 or 7 fits a year and they don't seem to have affected his health as he is still as fit as a fiddle at the ripe old age of at least 17!
Claire
Claire Thank you so much for posting this. It's really good to read a positive outcome from these "fits" . Vince has only had four over a period of 15 months. It's nice to know that our vets are in agreement over what to do about it. Much love to Gordon he sounds like a real character :wink:
Vince doodle ...you will always find him in the kitchen at parties ......

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shellsie
Posts: 727
Joined: 07 Jul 2012, 18:47
Location: Cumbria

Re: Murphy has Epilepsy

Post by shellsie » 07 Jan 2013, 23:05

Oh grief, poor Murphy. If u had asked me about childhood epilepsy then I have a world of knowledge as my oldest son has severe epilepsy, it's a horrible condition isn't it. I don't know anything about it in dogs, as in if any of the triggers are the same etc etc. Hope they can get the seizures under some kind of control.

You do get used to it, although it's never nice to witness. Best wishes to u and Murphy xxxx


Dawn, Shellsie and Biggles xxx
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Clairejen
Posts: 2995
Joined: 29 Oct 2009, 16:31
Location: Kings Lynn

Re: Murphy has Epilepsy

Post by Clairejen » 07 Jan 2013, 23:49

So sorry to hear this, fits are frightening things to watch. Depending on the cause, they can shortlived and infrequent and not cause any major problems. I have a friend whose jrt has very frequent "petit mal" fits (daily when he is going through a bad patch) and he has lived with that for several years and is healthy in all other respects. However, our first dog started fitting late in life (12) and could never get out of fits without medical intervention.

My only suggestion would be to keep a diary and note possible triggers, things which cause stress, noises, even air quality. This could give you an insight into things which set him off and could be avoided.
Claire
slave of Leon & Sally
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iwantadog
Posts: 2884
Joined: 29 Sep 2008, 19:50
Location: Dorset

Re: Murphy has Epilepsy

Post by iwantadog » 08 Jan 2013, 16:17

Thank you all for your kind comments and advice.
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keegan family
Posts: 504
Joined: 12 May 2009, 19:46
Location: Drayton, Norwich

Re: Murphy has Epilepsy

Post by keegan family » 08 Jan 2013, 16:55

Sorry to hear about Murphy and Vince , it must be distressing for all of you , hope the fits are few and far between , been ages since we saw Vince , be nice to catch up soon. X

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Immi
Posts: 1129
Joined: 15 Jul 2012, 23:53
Location: North Wales

Re: Murphy has Epilepsy

Post by Immi » 08 Jan 2013, 17:40

Hi there, sorry to hear about Murphy's diagnosis of epilepsy. It sounds as if the seizures are fairly infrequent which is a good thing, and that medicating is currently an option you can do without. You mentioned about diet, there is a great website here which goes over all the basics regarding food, and much much more: http://www.canine-epilepsy.com/healthyd ... l#dogsbarf I believe there is much to be said for grain free and raw diets to help control canine (and feline) epilepsy.

One of our cats has epilepsy, and is set off by stress more often than not. It's not usually immediate, her generalised (convulsions) seizures generally occur a day or two after severe stress (like moving house or going into a cattery), so we are able to dose her with diazepam for a few days if we know there is stress is likely. But we don't medicate her regularly, I think it's unfair and unnecessary unless the seizure are seriously affecting the quality of life. Medication can really dull an animal's senses and behaviour which I just think detracts from their life quality. Her more regular seizures are complex partial seizures, where she wanders around oblivious to anything, making strange noises and bumping into things she hasn't seen. There is no predicting these, although they generally occur after feeding in the evening. Interestingly since changing our cats' diets to a semi-raw combination with Applaws her seizure frequency has dropped significantly, although time will tell if it just a statistical anomaly.

It is terrifying seeing a seizure for the first time in a pet, but believe me (being epileptic myself) it is worse for the onlooker than it is for the epileptic experiencing the seizure. It is most important for you to remain calm and reassuring so that when Murphy comes around things make sense for him. If you are in a state of panic or high anxiety he'll pick up on it, and he'll feel unsettled not understanding why you are behaving so strangely. Murphy will have no memory or understanding of the seizure he has just gone through, as far as he's concerned he will think he's been asleep.
Gav & Becks.
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iwantadog
Posts: 2884
Joined: 29 Sep 2008, 19:50
Location: Dorset

Re: Murphy has Epilepsy

Post by iwantadog » 08 Jan 2013, 18:21

Thank you Immi. The thing about his fits that upsets me the most is that I can't explain to him whats happening or that he can't tell me when he's going to have one. I usually just sit with him when he's having a fit and reassure him. I got the kids to watch his last fit, as they witnessed his first fit which was a very severe one and got extremely upset, so it was good for them to see him just have a mild one, as they are obviously going to have to get used to him fitting, as are my husband and I.

I will look at the website link.

Thank you.

Wendy
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