Puppy overbite

An area to discuss any health concerns you may have in your dog or questions about health matters in general
Post Reply
Jaybz
Posts: 128
Joined: 03 Jan 2013, 23:09
Location: Sale, Cheshire (Manchester)

Puppy overbite

Post by Jaybz » 07 Mar 2013, 12:00

We picked up Bella from the breeder on 2nd March at 8 weeks, with a clean bill of health. However, when we took her to our vet for her jabs and a check-up, we discovered that her lower jaw is misaligned and that her lower canines are jabbing her palette on one side and her gum on the other, and she now has a little hole which the canine tooth has made. The vet seemed concerned, but tried not to be too alarming, and suggested that she may possibly grow out of it.

Fortunately, it doesn't seem to affect her eating or chewing so far, and the hole has not perforated into her sinuses or become infected.

Does anyone else have experience with this? I'm trying to be brave, but really, I'm a little worried! (Especially as insurance may not cover what it views as 'dental' work!)

Doodle Dee
Posts: 3346
Joined: 30 Dec 2012, 13:50
Location: Waltham Abbey
Contact:

Re: Puppy overbite

Post by Doodle Dee » 07 Mar 2013, 13:01

I think a lot of dogs are born with overbite and normally not a lot of problem (my friends king charles had one so he couldnt be shown). I wouldnt worry unless the vet tells you to worry and maybe check your insurance cos its not like she has rotten teeth or a tooth that needs to come out!
Lulu & Dx

ImageImage

User avatar
tynkerbelluk
Posts: 1518
Joined: 08 Feb 2010, 08:54

Re: Puppy overbite

Post by tynkerbelluk » 07 Mar 2013, 13:54

Hi Jaybz,
Yes I do have experience of this. My last dog (Irish Setter) had one of his canines piercing his palate. Unless you are planning to 'show' or breed from them then it is not something I would worry about. Our vet referred us to a dental veterinary practice who gave us the choice of either 'cutting' and 'capping' the tooth (if we were worried about the cosmetic effect of having a gap) or simply removing the tooth. He did advise that if our Setter liked to chew it would probably be better to remove it as the chewing of sticks, bones etc would make the chances of the cap coming off more likely. This would result in future trips to the dental vet (who was not local) in order to refix.
The one question I did ask was whether the loss of the canine would cause him to dribble more or have more difficulty in chewing as he was a 'soft mouthed' dog.
His answer was no.
Needless to say he never even realised it was missing. Quite a few people commented on the fact that he only had the one canine when he 'smiled' at them Image :lol: :lol:
Sharron and Archie

Image

User avatar
Bid
Posts: 18722
Joined: 03 Nov 2006, 20:30
Location: South Dorset
Contact:

Re: Puppy overbite

Post by Bid » 07 Mar 2013, 14:36

FUnnily enough I was reading about this the other day, on this website.....http://www.mudicompass.org/teethandbite.html

It says that it is common for a puppy's lower jaw to continue growing until they are 9 months of age, if that is so then he may yet grow out of it.
www.dogtrekker.co.uk
Image
Beauty without vanity, strength without insolence, courage without ferocity, and all the virtues of man without his vices - Byron

SallyV
Posts: 80
Joined: 28 Sep 2010, 17:23

Re: Puppy overbite

Post by SallyV » 08 Mar 2013, 10:28

We had a similar although simpler situation to you in that Inka had a lower canine milk tooth that was making a hole on her upper palate. It was growing slightly inwards and in the end the vet advised us to have it removed so that it would allow the adult tooth to come through at the correct angle as it would not be following the line of the milk tooth. It involved a quick operation with general aneasthetic and the vet gently eased the canine out. It was a hugely long tooth as it curved at 90 degrees following the line of the jaw bone. It is a much bigger operation in an adult dog with adult teeth as the canine is very firmly embedded into the jaw.
It cost £350 including microchipping which I had done whilst she was under the anaesthetic. I don't have insurance so I don't know what the situation is regarding claiming.
She was bouncing around the next day and the adult tooth has grown through beautifully.
Hope that helps!

Sally , Effie and Inka

Jaybz
Posts: 128
Joined: 03 Jan 2013, 23:09
Location: Sale, Cheshire (Manchester)

Re: Puppy overbite

Post by Jaybz » 08 Mar 2013, 14:02

Thanks for all the useful feedback. She's got another appointment at the vet for her second jab, so I'll ask again just to be sure. She's gorgeous just the same and we love her even with her little wonky smile!

pixie's mum
Posts: 2445
Joined: 22 Nov 2011, 19:22
Location: Cheshire

Re: Puppy overbite

Post by pixie's mum » 08 Mar 2013, 22:17

Hi Julie

Don't worry too much at this stage - she has a lot of growing and changing to do and as long as she is otherwise healthy and happy it will be ok
I would ask the same vet to monitor her regularly so that any subtle changes can be measured to see if she is growing out of it or any other course of action that should be taken
Can't wait to meet her soon
Kathy
ImageImage
ImageImage

Post Reply